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I’m glad I know WordPress

by Catherine Jan on August 24, 2014

In June 2011 I published Freelance translators: Should you blog? and forgot one thing.

One huge advantage of blogging: You get to know WordPress.

Knowing WordPress might come in handy

Speaking from experience, having some WordPress experience has proven to be useful:

  • Listing WordPress on my résumé helped me get interviews for writing jobs
  • I use some WordPress knowledge at work
  • I use it for personal writing projects with some ease

A good warmup for future professional or personal projects

WordPress unexpectedly became my friend. Could it be worthwhile for you too? Thanks to the WordPress dashboard, I’m not lost when editors or web designers or SEO people make these references:

  • HTML
  • H1, H2 and H3
  • widget
  • plugin
  • title tag
  • meta description
  • thumbnail
  • navigation bar
  • Read More tag
  • anchor

WordPress dashboard

I get by with a little help from my friends

Knowing nothing about blogs in 2010, I had an experienced WordPress user set me up. I now maintain this blog mostly on my own, for better or for worse, asking friends for help when I get stuck. I’ve made my share of technical mistakes on this blog, but I know how to publish a post, add images, edit the URL, move around widgets, and even change the code.

Those moves might be useful for translators and writers in certain specializations.

If you don’t need to be tech-savvy, I get it

For some language pros, knowing how to send an email and use good ol’ Microsoft Word is enough. I can understand that. I’ve never used a CAT tool myself and I never saw the need.

WordPress: A skill worth investing in?

If your WordPress experience has been helpful or completely useless, I’d appreciate hearing from you.

(This post is WordPress-centric because I know nothing about Blogger, Typepad or any other platform.)

 

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